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The Unsocial Dilema (Muze Box)

THE 'UNSOCIAL' DILEMMA

2 Min Read
September 5, 2021
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A sequel to the Netflix smash hit 'The Social Dilemma' perhaps?

Not quite, but if it's a topic worth raising to Dr. Dre, then it's a topic worth raising! We'll get to that soon.

It is no secret how many conversations one could raise when it comes to musicians and social media. For now, let's touch base on one of them.

Can musicians be 'social' and still obtain 'mystique'?

There is no doubt that being active on social media for musicians (especially up and comers) is a vital platform to be a part of when it comes to building a fan base, sharing new music, promoting tour dates, or interacting live. But has this new-age way of being a self-promoting artist on social media destroyed one of the most valuable asset an artist has to offer?... Mystique!

For example, let's take a few names like Kurt Cobain, Jeff Buckley, and Jim Morrison. Despite their obvious talents, there was no question in their ability to resonate a particular type of mystique that played a major part in their success. Now imagine any one of those names being a part of social media the way musicians are expected to be today. It's hard to even imagine watching Kurt Cobain sitting in his pajamas talking to fans on Instagram or Jim Morrison dabbing on TikTok. Ok, so that one might have been a little far-fetched, but you get where I'm going.

Could these guys have ever engaged in social media without tarnishing one of their career's most valuable assets? And can the next generation of personality types like Kurt, Jeff, or Jim be active on social media and still acquire a mystique? It's hard to believe it's possible.

In an interview with Jimmy Iovine in British GQ, this is what Dr. Dre had to say about the topic.

Image Courtesy: Beats by Dre
I probably would've hated social media when I was coming up. There's a certain mystique that gets destroyed. I like the mystique. I like waiting. I don't need anybody to know where I am every minute or what I'm doing. Or what I'm about to do. There's a certain mystique that came along with music that was entertaining to wait to see what was about to happen.
Dr. Dre

An interesting perspective indeed!

Feature
TABLE OF
CONTENTS
The Unsocial Dilema (Muze Box)

THE 'UNSOCIAL' DILEMMA

2 Min Read
September 5, 2021
Copied To Clipboard
Feature

A sequel to the Netflix smash hit 'The Social Dilemma' perhaps?

Not quite, but if it's a topic worth raising to Dr. Dre, then it's a topic worth raising! We'll get to that soon.

It is no secret how many conversations one could raise when it comes to musicians and social media. For now, let's touch base on one of them.

Can musicians be 'social' and still obtain 'mystique'?

There is no doubt that being active on social media for musicians (especially up and comers) is a vital platform to be a part of when it comes to building a fan base, sharing new music, promoting tour dates, or interacting live. But has this new-age way of being a self-promoting artist on social media destroyed one of the most valuable asset an artist has to offer?... Mystique!

For example, let's take a few names like Kurt Cobain, Jeff Buckley, and Jim Morrison. Despite their obvious talents, there was no question in their ability to resonate a particular type of mystique that played a major part in their success. Now imagine any one of those names being a part of social media the way musicians are expected to be today. It's hard to even imagine watching Kurt Cobain sitting in his pajamas talking to fans on Instagram or Jim Morrison dabbing on TikTok. Ok, so that one might have been a little far-fetched, but you get where I'm going.

Could these guys have ever engaged in social media without tarnishing one of their career's most valuable assets? And can the next generation of personality types like Kurt, Jeff, or Jim be active on social media and still acquire a mystique? It's hard to believe it's possible.

In an interview with Jimmy Iovine in British GQ, this is what Dr. Dre had to say about the topic.

Image Courtesy: Beats by Dre
I probably would've hated social media when I was coming up. There's a certain mystique that gets destroyed. I like the mystique. I like waiting. I don't need anybody to know where I am every minute or what I'm doing. Or what I'm about to do. There's a certain mystique that came along with music that was entertaining to wait to see what was about to happen.
Dr. Dre

An interesting perspective indeed!